RESEARCH ARTICLE


Effect of Harvesting Time, Curing and Storage Methods on Storability of Garlic Bulbs



Bizuayehu Desta1, 2, *, Kebede Woldetsadik1, Wassu M. Ali1
1 School of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
2 Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia


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Creative Commons License
© 2021 Desta et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia; Tel: +251911386054; E-mail: bdesta4@gmail.com


Abstract

Background:

Farmers are forced to store garlic bulbs for a long period due to occasional excess production or to save bulb seeds for next season planting, but the bulbs often lose their viability and vigour due to sprouting ahead of planting time.

Objective:

The research was conducted to evaluate the effects of three harvest stages (60, 80, and 100% top fall), two curing levels (non-cured and cured bulbs), and three storage methods (floor, shelf, and net bag) on storability of garlic variety ‘Tseday’ at Haramaya University, and Tony farm (Dire Dawa) during 2014-15.

Methods:

The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications at both sites.

Results:

Significant variations in the storability of bulbs were evident due to harvest stages, curing, and storage methods. Harvesting of garlic bulbs at 100% top fall considerably increased bulb yield by about 16.74% and 8.75% compared to 60 and 80% top fall, respectively. Cured bulbs showed lower fresh bulb yield as compared to non-cured bulbs. Harvesting at 80% top fall, curing and storing bulbs on a shelf or in a net bag showed reduced weight and diameter loss of bulbs as compared to the other treatments. Bulbs harvested at 80% top fall and cured had significantly higher dry matter content than the rest. The highest sprouting percentage was recorded for 60% top fall harvested and non-cured bulbs, while the least was observed in 80% top fall harvested and cured bulbs.

Conclusion:

The result of this study has shown that harvesting at 80% top fall, curing, and storing bulbs on a shelf or in a net bag leads to a good yield and postharvest quality and effective storability of garlic bulbs under ambient storage conditions.

Keywords: Curing, Garlic bulb, Postharvest quality, Shelf life, Storage site, Photosynthates.